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UK Migration News - Weekly Roundup

by Dominic 21/06/2012 16:46:00

In a busy week for immigration news, the Home Secretary Theresa May instructed parliament to help her send a strong message to the judicial, the Government's changes to UK visa policies needed attention and Labour Leader Ed Miliband was tasked with swallowing his pride and admitting his predecessors' mistakes. 


Parliament expected to rally around UK immigration rules

Parliament is expected to pass a vote today which will mean convicted foreign nationals can no longer exploit the right to family life to prevent deportation...read more.

Britain reassures Indian students over visa issues

British diplomats have sought to reassure Indian students who have baulked at the recent changes made to visa policy...read more.


Olympic performers to avoid immigration delays

Performers taking part in the cultural festival to mark the run up to the London Olympics will receive special assistance to help them avoid delays...read more.

Supreme Court supporting parliament's insistence?

After a home secretary-led motion by the Parliament to urge judges not to prioritise foreign criminals' rights to family life over deportation, the Supreme Court has passed judgement in five deportation appeals, upholding only one...read more.


Labour admit immigration failures

Leader of the Labour Party Ed Miliband is to give a speech today in which he will admit the previous Labour government's failings on UK immigration policy and outline his party's new policies...read more.



Parliament expected to rally around UK immigration rules

 

Parliament is expected to support
Mrs May's proposal to limit abuse
of Article 8.

Parliament is expected to pass a vote today which will mean convicted foreign nationals can no longer exploit the right to family life to prevent deportation.

Under current UK immigration legislation, a foreign national convicted of a criminal offence will be deported unless they can prove they have genuine and legitimate grounds to remain in the country.

The grounds are usually based on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights:

Article 8 – Right to respect for private and family life

1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.

2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.

However, a multitude of cases in recent years has led the Home Secretary Theresa May to claim the right is being exploited to allow violent and dangerous criminals to avoid deportation. Mrs May contends British judges are 'softer than their European counterparts' in enforcing the law...


...to read the rest of this article, click here.

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Britain reassures Indian students over visa issues

British diplomats insist UK visas 
are available to genuine students.
 

British diplomats have sought to reassure Indian students who have baulked at the recent changes made to visa policy.

Demand for the student visas has reportedly dropped 62% in the wake of changes which include the limiting of employment rights and the abolishment of post study work rights for international students who have graduated.

International education is a multi-billion pound industry for the UK and, with India representing one of the largest contributors of foreign students, diplomats at the British embassy in India have insisted the changes will not restrict the 'brightest and best' from studying in the UK.

"University students who are studying at or above degree level may work for up to 20 hours per week during term time and full time in the holidays," said Thomas Greig, regional director for the UKBA in South Asia.

Mr Greig said the changes were to tackle the rates of abuse by international students who enter the UK ostensibly to study but end up in employment. Mr Grieg assured Indian students that the changes would not prevent genuine students from entering the UK.

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Olympic performers to avoid immigration delays

London 2012

Parliament is expected to support
Mrs May's proposal to limit abuse
of Article 8.

Performers taking part in the cultural festival to mark the run up to the London Olympics will receive special assistance to help them avoid delays.

Over 25,000 performers will take part in the 12 week festival; with 130 events held across the UK, the festival is being hailed as the largest cultural festival Britain has ever staged.

In order to ensure the festival progresses as smoothly as possible, the event's organisers have been coordinating with the Home Office to allow performers' UK visa applications to be given priority processing to avoid delays at the UK's borders.

"We've got special status and the immigration authorities have been exceptional so far," said Ruth McKenzie, London 2012 Festival director. "We have a massive amount of artists coming and there's always a danger that some artists don't leave enough time for the [visa] process."

Performers have been instructed to register their biometric details - fingerprints and photographs - registered in advance otherwise they will be processed upon arrival.

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt said two million people had already purchased tickets for the various events.

"People are just beginning to appreciate the scale of the excitement," said Mr Hunt.

"It's a really huge moment."

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Supreme Court supporting parliament's insistence?

London 2012

The Supreme Court has
rejected 4 of 5 appeals.

After a home secretary-led motion by the Parliament to urge judges not to prioritise foreign criminals' rights to family life over deportation, the Supreme Court has passed judgement in five deportation appeals, upholding only one.

The Supreme Court ruled on five separate UK immigration cases of deportation appeals yesterday, involving Polish, Italian and British citizens. All the appeals were based on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the right to family life.

After the Home Secretary Theresa May asked for the support of the Parliament on Tuesday, MPs passed a motion which called on the judiciary to prioritise the public interest over the individual in instances of foreign criminals.

It would appear the Parliament's insistence has been noted after the court ruled that just one of the five cases, involving a Polish national with five children who is wanted in her home country on dishonesty charges, had genuine cause to remain in the country.

The other four cases, including an Italian couple wanted for drug importation charges who have three children and two British nationals wanted for importing drug manufacturing chemicals who have six children between them, were judged to not involve strong enough causes to 'overcome the overwhelming public interest in giving effect to the extradition request'.

The rulings have been praised by many including civil liberties groups who welcomed the decision to stay the Polish woman's deportation on the grounds her young children would be severely affected if their mother is deported.

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Labour admit immigration failures

Ed Miliband

Labour Leader Ed Miliband will
address the IPPR today.

Leader of the Labour Party Ed Miliband is to give a speech today in which he will admit the previous Labour government's failings on UK immigration policy and outline his party's new policies.

The current coalition Government has made significant changes to UK immigration policies which have seen new restrictions added to visa policy, intra-company transfer policy and the removal of foreign criminals. The efforts are a part of a long term goal of reducing current levels of net migration, approximately 250,000, down to the 'tens of thousands'.

The Government blames its predecessor for allowing uncontrolled immigration from new EU states in 2004 which saw an influx of Eastern European migrants come to the UK.

In a speech at the Institute of Public Policy Research think tank to be given today, Mr Miliband is expected to acknowledge those errors...

...to read the rest of this story, click here.

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- Dominic Ladden-Powell is the Online Editor for the UK Visa Bureau.

Visa Bureau takes no responsibility and cannot be held accountable for action taken as a result of any information or comment provided on this blog, and we recommend that you always seek a number of opinions before making a decision regarding your migration or visa application. Please refer to the Visa Bureau terms of use for more information.

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